Posts Tagged 'marketing'

The Internet? Bah! Why cyberspace isn’t, and will never be, nirvana

Wow, this guy was so wrong…

I bet he regrets writing this article for Newsweek in 1995. This is clearly a case of a guy lacking any foresight.

Below are a few choice comments:

“Visionaries see a future of telecommuting workers, interactive libraries and multimedia classrooms. They speak of electronic town meetings and virtual communities. Commerce and business will shift from offices and malls to networks and modems. And the freedom of digital networks will make government more democratic.

Baloney. Do our computer pundits lack all common sense? The truth in no online database will replace your daily newspaper, no CD-ROM can take the place of a competent teacher and no computer network will change the way government works.”

“Yet Nicholas Negroponte, director of the MIT Media Lab, predicts that we’ll soon buy books and newspapers straight over the Internet. Uh, sure.”

“We’re told that multimedia will make schoolwork easy and fun. Students will happily learn from animated characters while taught by expertly tailored software… These expensive toys are difficult to use in classrooms and require extensive teacher training.”

“Then there’s cyber business. We’re promised instant catalog shopping–just point and click for great deals. We’ll order airline tickets over the network, make restaurant reservations and negotiate sales contracts. Stores will become obsolete. So how come my local mall does more business in an afternoon than the entire Internet handles in a month? Even if there were a trustworthy way to send money over the Internet–which there isn’t–the network is missing a most essential ingredient of capitalism: salespeople.”

Hillarious!

The Marketing Power of Dogs

According to a recent Harris poll, nearly two-thirds of Americans have a pet. Seven in 10 pet owners have a dog. Furthermore, 93% of dog owners consider their pet to be a part of the family.

Take a minute to think about what that means. It means that those 93% of dog owners consider their pets to be a major part of their lives. How major? Again, according to the Harris poll, nearly 70% of pet owners let their pets sleep in their bed. Another 65% buy their pets a gift for Christmas. In essence, many dogs enjoy the type of lifestyle afforded to the humans in their family.

How can you benefit from these findings? You can set yourself apart from much of your competition, if you or your business makes a point to embrace dog owners.

Run a grocery store or market? Consider letting dog owners bring in their pets while they shop, and promote the heck out of it.

Own a business? Let your employees bring their dogs to work or provide an onsite dog-sitting service, and promote the heck out of it.

There are many possibilities.

Dog owners, like their pets, are faithful. If your market let’s them bring in their pet, they’ll start shopping at your store versus the one down the street. If your business lets employees bring in their dogs, that a great way to increase employee happiness – thus reducing turnover and snagging better employees than your competition.

Now I’m fully aware that there are limitations and you have to work out the details. But imagine the new market you open up to yourself – a large (two-thirds) and faithful market. It might be worth the effort!

Web marketing concepts: part 8

8. Think stories not pitches

Did you hear the one about the farmer’s daughter and the search engine optimizer? Stories, everyone loves stories. In fact, before the invention of the Gutenberg press, oral storytelling was the way knowledge got passed down from one generation to the next, and how news was sent from one region to another.

Now that we have this multimedia Web environment, we can continue the tradition of real people who deliver creative audio and video presentations that capture the imagination and drive home the marketing message so your audience won’t forget who you are.

Nothing informs, engages, and entertains like a good story: Sounds to me like one heck of a way to sell to an audience desperate for meaningful communication.

Courtesy of Jerry Bader

Base your wording on your target audience

Today’s edition of Get to the Point took on the topic of using five-dollar words. Two copywriters, Simon Glickman and Julia Rubiner, claim that using a five-dollar words is OK because “people actually love the audacious use of language.”

Then there are people who claim that you should use only every day words, 50-cent words. Why? Because big five-dollar words alienate customers and sound elitist.

I disagree with both points.

There’s not just one rule to follow. You can’t use big words or every day words and expect great results. It just doesn’t happen like that.

You have to tailor your wording to your target audience. If your target audience is highly educated and love and understand industry buzz words, then use those five-dollar words. If your target audience is your every day Joe, then go with simple words.

The only magic formula is to know your target audience.


Who am I ?

My name is Michael Morton. I believe in bringing energy and professionalism into the office, that knowledge is power, that leadership trumps management, that customers are more influential than advertisements, that content is king, and that two heads are better than one. I currently lead the marketing efforts of the Strategic Alliances department of my company. Let’s talk marketing!

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